2017-2020 Projects

This regulatory impact assessment was commissioned by the Ministry of Health (MOH) under Mulago National Referral Hospital Administration, following the proposal to establish a National Specialised Hospital (MNSH) at Mulago in order to respond to the increasing need to provide specialized care for critical illnesses.

We conducted consultations with key stakeholders including semi-autonomous bodies in the health sector, Mulago Hospital administration, line Ministry of Health departments, Directors of Regional Referral Hospitals, Medical research and training institutions, Development partners and UN agencies. In addition, we reviewed key national health policies and legislation and performance reports of the Ministry of Health and Mulago National referral Hospital. We conducted a benefit-cost analysis and an impact (economic, social and political) analysis in the assessment. The impact assessment was conducted between May – July 2017 and funded the Government of Uganda through Mulago National Referral Hospital and Ministry of Health.

PADRI in collaboration with researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), UK  conducted a study for the evaluation of the Merck for Uganda Mothers (MUM)-Profam Social Franchise in Uganda.

The study involved a cross-sectional survey of women 760 who had attended a MUM-ProFam facility for ANC and/or delivery care and who had delivered in the last three months prior to the time of the survey to understand their pathway of care and their experiences of care during the current pregnancy.  The study also involved a facility survey involving 15 randomly selected ProFam facilities (eight PFP and seven PNFP facilities) stratified by type of delivery services provided – whether the facility was providing Comprehensive Emergency Obstetrics Care) or Basic Emergency Obstetrics Care.

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women, community health workers, franchisees and staff of the implementing agency in Uganda (PACE) to draw out perceptions and experiences of the social franchise – including costing and quality of care – alongside unstructured observations at the facilities

We conducted Interviews were with the facility managers/in-charge to understand the changes each social franchisee went through when joining the MUM programme. The survey was conducted from July to November, 2015 in 1 districts (“i.e”. Wakiso, Kiboga, Kayunga, Jinja, Kyenjojo, Kabarole, Ibanda, Hoima, Bukedea, Soroti, Amolatar, Lira, Gulu and Nebbi district) in  Central, Southwest, Western, Northern and Eastern Uganda.  The evaluation was funded by Merck International through the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London.

 

The Government of Uganda (GoU), through the National Planning Authority (NPA) commissioned PADRI to develop a Local Government (LG) development Issues paper for the National Development Plan II 2015/16-2019/20 to guide the implementation of the Uganda Vision 2040, of “A transformed Ugandan Society from a peasant to a modern and prosperous country within 30 years”.

PADRI conducted country-wide consultations with LG leaders at district, Municipality and sub-county levels (including both political and technical leadership); and other stakeholders at national level, to elicit their views on the priority development issues for the NDP II. The Key issues that were explored include: Improving the functionality of the LGs for effective service delivery, by  improving the LG revenue base; improving the capacity and levels of staffing; strengthening the planning function and monitoring and evaluation of LGs; and addressing governance issues – particularly   addressing the high levels of corruption; and improving the capacity and competencies of the political leadership (mostly councillors) at LG level, to perform their policy-making and oversight functions.  Other issues were: Improving Community mobilization for development; promoting the Local Economic Development (LED) and promoting comprehensive physical planning for urban development. The study was conducted between March and October 2014 and funded by GoU.

The Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) commissioned PADRI to undertake a qualitative assessment of the coverage of diarrhea treatment (zinc and ORS) for children in Uganda.

 

The study investigated the availability, pricing practices and provider’s knowledge, attitude and behavior on the use of ORS/Zinc. Interviews were conducted with 31 private providers from the North, East, South-west, Central, West-Nile and Western Uganda.  The study was conducted between July-Sept 2015 and funded by CHAI.

 

 

PADRI, in partnership with Development Pathways conducted the fieldwork for the Uganda Cost of Living with Disability Survey (UCLDS) commissioned by the Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development and conducted by Development (MGLSD). The Survey was the first of its kind to provide a situational analysis of disability in Uganda.

It aimed at collecting information needed to estimate the ‘cost of disability’ and resource needs of people with disabilities relative to the population as a whole. This information is critical for determining adequate levels of income support and for prioritizing service provision for people with disabilities. PADRI was directly involved in managing the fieldwork activities, which included over 4000 households from 76 districts across all the regions in Uganda.

The households included those with a member with a functional difficulty (50%) and those with no member experiencing any form of functional difficulty (50%). The sample was randomly determined through a rigorous process which involved screening all households in each of the 129 enumeration areas selected by UBOS, based on the 2014 National Population and Housing Census sampling frame, to determine households with a member with functional difficulty and those without any member with a functional difficulty.  Using the World Bank Survey-solutions program, households in each category were then selected for interviews. The data collection activities took place from September to November 2019. The findings of this situational analysis of the will be used by Government for policy development and programming for appropriate interventions for people living with disabilities in Uganda. More details can be obtained from the contact person for this survey at MGLSD (Ms. Emily Ajiambo: email: ajiamboemily@gmail.com)

PADRI staff joined other researchers from ACE Policy Research Institute to conduct a scoping study of refugees in Uganda from March – November, 2019. The study involved fieldwork in 15 refugee settlements and host communities in 12 refugee hosting districts of Arua, Koboko, Yumbe, Adjumani, Lamwo, Moyo, Isingiro, Kamwenge, Kyegegwa, Hoima, Kiryandongo, and Kampala.

The scoping study involved a survey of over 1500 refugee households, focus group discussions with refugees and members of the host communities, and key informant interviews at the district local governments and at the National Level.  The issues examined in the scoping study include: the legal and institutional frameworks regarding refugee management in Uganda; planning capacity and frameworks at national and Local Government levels; productive capacity and livelihoods among refugees; service delivery in refugee settlements; sustainable financing for refugee response; environmental conservation and alternative energy sources; and the political economy of refugee issues in Uganda.

The findings of the study were synthesized to come up with a refugee issues paper for the National Development Plan (NDP) III to guide incorporating the refugee issues in the development planning over the next 5 years. The study was Commissioned by the National
Planning Authority (NPA) with funding from the World Bank-Uganda

2014-2016 Projects

PADRI in collaboration with researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), UK  conducted a study for the evaluation of the Merck for Uganda Mothers (MUM)-Profam Social Franchise in Uganda.

The study involved a cross-sectional survey of women 760 who had attended a MUM-ProFam facility for ANC and/or delivery care and who had delivered in the last three months prior to the time of the survey to understand their pathway of care and their experiences of care during the current pregnancy.  The study also involved a facility survey involving 15 randomly selected ProFam facilities (eight PFP and seven PNFP facilities) stratified by type of delivery services provided – whether the facility was providing Comprehensive Emergency Obstetrics Care) or Basic Emergency Obstetrics Care. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women, community health workers, franchisees and staff of the implementing agency in Uganda (PACE) to draw out perceptions and experiences of the social franchise – including costing and quality of care – alongside unstructured observations at the facilities

We conducted Interviews were with the facility managers/in-charge to understand the changes each social franchisee went through when joining the MUM programme. The survey was conducted from July to November, 2015 in 1 districts (“i.e”. Wakiso, Kiboga, Kayunga, Jinja, Kyenjojo, Kabarole, Ibanda, Hoima, Bukedea, Soroti, Amolatar, Lira, Gulu and Nebbi district) in  Central, Southwest, Western, Northern and Eastern Uganda.  The evaluation was funded by Merck International through the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London.

The Government of Uganda (GoU), through the National Planning Authority (NPA) commissioned PADRI to develop a Local Government (LG) development Issues paper for the National Development Plan II 2015/16-2019/20 to guide the implementation of the Uganda Vision 2040, of “A transformed Ugandan Society from a peasant to a modern and prosperous country within 30 years”.

PADRI conducted country-wide consultations with LG leaders at district, Municipality and sub-county levels (including both political and technical leadership); and other stakeholders at national level, to elicit their views on the priority development issues for the NDP II. The Key issues that were explored include: Improving the functionality of the LGs for effective service deliveryby  improving the LG revenue base; improving the capacity and levels of staffing; strengthening the planning function and monitoring and evaluation of LGs; and addressing governance issues – particularly   addressing the high levels of corruption; and improving the capacity and competencies of the political leadership (mostly councillors) at LG level, to perform their policy-making and oversight functions.

Other issues were: Improving Community mobilization for development; promoting the Local Economic Development (LED) and promoting comprehensive physical planning for urban development. The study was conducted between March and October 2014 and funded by GoU.

The Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) commissioned PADRI to undertake a qualitative assessment of the coverage of diarrhea treatment (zinc and ORS) for children in Uganda. . The study investigated the availability, pricing practices and provider’s knowledge, attitude and behavior on the use of ORS/Zinc. Interviews were conducted with 31 private providers from the North, East, South-west, Central, West-Nile and Western Uganda.  The study was conducted between July-Sept 2015 and funded by CHAI.

2011-2013 Projects

This project aimed at assessing the impact of providing improved water services to peri-urban households in Kampala district. The survey for the project was conducted in 69 parishes, involving a total of 1004 households. The household information collected included: socio-demographic data, time use, water needs and, sources of water and associated costs- including time spent for collection and reasons for choice of water sources used.

The survey also collected data on food consumption (both purchased and home-grown), quantity and quality of household assets such as housing, and other household goods as a measure of household welfare. Biometric data (i.e. weight and height) for children 7 years and below was also recorded to assess the impact of improved water services on child development. The study was undertaken in 2011 and funded by Global Partnership on Output Based Aid of the World Bank

PADRI researchers, in collaboration with research colleagues from, the Faculty of Business & Administration Uganda Christian University undertook a study to explore the costs of motorcycle accidents and the pain, grief and sufferings of the motorcycle accident victims using a multi-method approach. The specific objectives of this study were to estimate the direct and indirect costs of motorcycle accidents; establish the pain, grief and suffering of motorcycle accident victims; and draw policy recommendations for improving road safety in Uganda. The data was obtained from multiple sources, including survey of 1600 motorcycle riders (popularly known as boda boda) in Kawempe and Central divisions  Kampala Capital City Authority, interviews with accident victims and their immediate family members,  traffic police records, hospitals and national statistics.

Data from the survey of motorcyclists and from the qualitative interviews were used to estimate and describe the tangible and intangible costs of motorcycle accidents- both for fatality and severe injuries. The Willingness-to-pay (WTP) approach was used to estimate the value that boda boda riders would pay for reducing the risk of loss of life based on Contingent Valuation (CV) method.  The study also explored the key coping mechanisms adopted by the Boda-boda riders amidst the challenges the riders face when they suffer motorcycle accidents. The unique contribution of this approach is that it offers an in-depth investigation of the pain, grief and suffering by drawing on rich qualitative interviews conducted with the Boda-boda riders who have suffered a motorcycle accident and the family members of the Boda-boda riders who died because of motorcycle accidents. The estimates showed that it costs approximately UGX 7 million (about US 2300 in 2014 prices) to treat a boda boda accident victim who is severely injured. This study was conducted between Nov 2013 and June 2014 and funded by CrossRoads, UK.

PADRI staff conducted a process evaluation of the distribution of Long Lasting Insect-treated Nets (LLIN), under the Stop Malaria Project by Malaria Consortium in Uganda.  The process evaluation identified the strengths and challenges to of the LLIN distribution during ANC visits at health centres to inform future programmes on the distribution of LLIN through health facilities in Uganda. Fieldwork was conducted in Kayunga, Hoima, Ssembabule, Mityana, Kumi and Serere district- covering a total of 38 health facilities.

The evaluation was done through a health facility survey, and in-depth interviews with the in-charge and /administrators of the health facilities, the district health officer (DHO) and other members of the district health team (DHT), district Biostatisticians  and officials at the Ministry of Health, National Malaria control Program (NMCP).  The process evaluation focused at the LLIN distribution chain, including coordination, supervision, record keeping and reporting, LLIN distribution to beneficiaries, behavioural change communication; and beneficiary assessment. The evaluation was conducted from May- August 2013 and was funded by Malaria Consortium-Uganda.

PADRI in collaboration with researchers from the School of Economics Nottingham University UK and medical practitioners from Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust participated in a randomized trial to evaluate the impact of providing orthotic equipment on life outcomes (economic and physical independence and wellbeing) for disabled adults in Uganda.

The study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, 800 people with physical disability (of the lower limb) were assessed and interviewed. Of these 400 were randomly assigned to the ‘intervention’ group and were allocated and assistive device depending on their condition, while 400 were assigned to the control group 9those who received no assistive device in the first phase). In the second phase,   all the 800 were reassessed and re-interviewed to establish the impact of the intervention and the same time, those in the control group were allocated an appropriate assistive device.

The impact of the equipment on physical independence and the quality of life of individuals, changes in skills, employment opportunities and income were measured based on the data collected from the intervention and control group in the 2 phases of the study. In addition to a survey of the people with disability (PWDs) who participated in the study, focus group discussions (FGDs) were held with community members to understand the community attitudes towards PWDs. The project results provide academics, policy makers, the Government of Uganda and international donors with important evidence and policy options for improving the lives of persons with physical disability in Uganda.  Phase 1 fieldwork was conducted in June 2012 and phase 2 in June 2013.  The National Union of Disabled Persons (NUDIPU) and Uganda National Action for Persons with Disability (UNPD) were the local institutions which participated in the study.

PADRI director led a cross- country study to investigate the role of social protection initiatives in promoting household welfare in Burundi, Kenya and Uganda. The Areas of interest were the role of Social Protection programs towards enterprise development for women, educational attainment for children and coping mechanism for economic and non-economic shocks and risks at household level. . Household surveys were conducted in Dokolo, Masindi and Moroto districts of Uganda; Ngozi province in Northern Burundi and Thika, Starehe and Kibera districts in Kenya. The surveys involved between 500 in Burundi and 1400- 1600 households in Kenya and Uganda.The research also involved in-depth interviews with agencies implementing various social protection programs at the district and national level. The research project was conducted between Dec 2010 and Nov 2013 and was funded by IDRC, Canada; under the IDRC projects coordination office in Kenya.

PADRI Director working with a team of international and locally-based consultants undertook a study of the   end of project evaluation for the “Stop Malaria Project” in Uganda. Fieldwork for the evaluation was conducted in 12 districts; 9 of which were project-supported while 3 non-project supported districts. Stop Malaria Project was s a USAID 5 year initiative that to address the malaria problem through a range of interventions including preventive and treatment of malaria in Uganda. The evaluation was conducted from Sept- Dec 2013 and funded by USAID/PMI-Uganda.